By Dartmouth - Tuck February 12, 2013 Leave a Comment

Last weekend was weird in North East. A major snow storm was expected. They even gave it a name – Nemo. Many offices in NYC were closed and events cancelled, Massachusetts even administered curfew. Ironically, me and my classmates participated in case competition at Columbia and anyway headed to NYC.
Well, the snowstorm did hit the North-East and NYC in particular, but in my perception was not that bad. I personally was amazed how efficiently streets and highways were cleaned. However, it’s not the snowstorm that became the highlight of the weekend.
Before the competition began, we got to listen to several speakers invited by organizers. When I was sitting and listening to the speeches under the Dome of Low Memorial Library at Columbia University (which is by the way neither low nor a library, but this gorgeous building with marble pillars and statues of great ancient Greeks and a Roman truly looks and feels like a temple of knowledge) it suddenly hit me that my Tuck MBA is like a ticket to outer space.
I deliberately don’t use the lottery analogy here, as I worked hard to be admitted to a top MBA program and I continue working hard. What I mean by the “ticket to outer space” – starting my Tuck MBA I made a step into a completely different dimension and to a completely new level of perception, the borders and horizons being pushed so far that I don’t see them anymore. To be honest, even when we reach our boldest and most ambitious goals, we get used to our new lifestyle and start taking it for granted. But there are moments when you pause and realize where you are, like ascending a mountain you would stop to catch your breath, look around and suddenly realize that you’re far above the ground you usually walk and what a gorgeous view opens from that point.
This idea hit me during the conference and just blew my mind. Two years ago I could not even dream about it, but last Friday I had an opportunity to listen (and ask questions!) to CEO of Becton Dickinson – one of the global leaders in development and manufacturing of medical devices and instruments; get story telling tips from Ogilvy PR Global CEO (who used to work as managing director for Wall Street Journal and VP of CNBC); and participate in discussion with Ernst & Young CEO. Apart from this, I met smart and ambitious people from other business school, pursuing similar goals in life. But the most amazing fact is that now I look at business problems differently, from a different angle and at a different level. And given a fair amount of information about company and industry I am capable of performing a comprehensive analysis and mapping out a strategy. Of course, in real life problem solving is more complex and takes much longer, yet in six months in an MBA program I made light years of personal and professional progress; it is pretty amazing and totally worth it.

Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)


By Dartmouth - Tuck February 12, 2013 Leave a Comment

Last weekend was weird in North East. A major snow storm was expected. They even gave it a name – Nemo. Many offices in NYC were closed and events cancelled, Massachusetts even administered curfew. Ironically, me and my classmates participated in case competition at Columbia and anyway headed to NYC.
Well, the snowstorm did hit the North-East and NYC in particular, but in my perception was not that bad. I personally was amazed how efficiently streets and highways were cleaned. However, it’s not the snowstorm that became the highlight of the weekend.
Before the competition began, we got to listen to several speakers invited by organizers. When I was sitting and listening to the speeches under the Dome of Low Memorial Library at Columbia University (which is by the way neither low nor a library, but this gorgeous building with marble pillars and statues of great ancient Greeks and a Roman truly looks and feels like a temple of knowledge) it suddenly hit me that my Tuck MBA is like a ticket to outer space.
I deliberately don’t use the lottery analogy here, as I worked hard to be admitted to a top MBA program and I continue working hard. What I mean by the “ticket to outer space” – starting my Tuck MBA I made a step into a completely different dimension and to a completely new level of perception, the borders and horizons being pushed so far that I don’t see them anymore. To be honest, even when we reach our boldest and most ambitious goals, we get used to our new lifestyle and start taking it for granted. But there are moments when you pause and realize where you are, like ascending a mountain you would stop to catch your breath, look around and suddenly realize that you’re far above the ground you usually walk and what a gorgeous view opens from that point.
This idea hit me during the conference and just blew my mind. Two years ago I could not even dream about it, but last Friday I had an opportunity to listen (and ask questions!) to CEO of Becton Dickinson – one of the global leaders in development and manufacturing of medical devices and instruments; get story telling tips from Ogilvy PR Global CEO (who used to work as managing director for Wall Street Journal and VP of CNBC); and participate in discussion with Ernst & Young CEO. Apart from this, I met smart and ambitious people from other business school, pursuing similar goals in life. But the most amazing fact is that now I look at business problems differently, from a different angle and at a different level. And given a fair amount of information about company and industry I am capable of performing a comprehensive analysis and mapping out a strategy. Of course, in real life problem solving is more complex and takes much longer, yet in six months in an MBA program I made light years of personal and professional progress; it is pretty amazing and totally worth it.

Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)


Copyright © 2017 MBAcrunch All Rights Reserved.