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    Henry Chesbrough Honored for Pioneering Ideas on Managing Innovation

    May 17th, 2017

    Henry ChesbroughHenry Chesbrough, faculty director of the Garwood Center for Corporate Innovation, was honored with a medal from the Industrial Research Institute (IRI) this month for his standout work in innovation management.

    Chesbrough, an adjunct professor who is widely recognized as the father of open innovation, accepted the medal at the IRI’s May 10 annual meeting. The IRI, which represents 200 industrial and service companies interested in effectively managing technological innovation, has awarded the medal since 1946 to top leaders in industrial research.

    Chesbrough said his own research has benefited greatly from the IRI and close observation of several of its member companies that have implemented open innovation.

    The open innovation concept, which Chesbrough introduced in 2003, argues that companies need to tear down the walls between their R&D organizations and outside companies and innovators. Chesbrough believes that businesses cannot afford to rely entirely on their own research, but should instead buy or license R&D processes and inventions such as patents from other companies.

    “As the pace of change quickens across industries, organizations are looking at open innovation not just as a tool for solving unique technology challenges, but for expanding it to include a wider variety of participants and making a significant impact on corporate business models,” Chesbrough said.  

    The recipient of multiple awards for his research, Chesbrough in 2015 was named to the Thinkers50 global ranking of management pioneers. The Thinkers50 global ranking of management thinkers, published every two years, has been described by the Financial Times and others as the “Oscars of management thinking.”

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    Henry Chesbrough Honored for Pioneering Ideas on Managing Innovation

    May 17th, 2017

    Henry ChesbroughHenry Chesbrough, faculty director of the Garwood Center for Corporate Innovation, was honored with a medal from the Industrial Research Institute (IRI) this month for his standout work in innovation management.

    Chesbrough, an adjunct professor who is widely recognized as the father of open innovation, accepted the medal at the IRI’s May 10 annual meeting. The IRI, which represents 200 industrial and service companies interested in effectively managing technological innovation, has awarded the medal since 1946 to top leaders in industrial research.

    Chesbrough said his own research has benefited greatly from the IRI and close observation of several of its member companies that have implemented open innovation.

    The open innovation concept, which Chesbrough introduced in 2003, argues that companies need to tear down the walls between their R&D organizations and outside companies and innovators. Chesbrough believes that businesses cannot afford to rely entirely on their own research, but should instead buy or license R&D processes and inventions such as patents from other companies.

    “As the pace of change quickens across industries, organizations are looking at open innovation not just as a tool for solving unique technology challenges, but for expanding it to include a wider variety of participants and making a significant impact on corporate business models,” Chesbrough said.  

    The recipient of multiple awards for his research, Chesbrough in 2015 was named to the Thinkers50 global ranking of management pioneers. The Thinkers50 global ranking of management thinkers, published every two years, has been described by the Financial Times and others as the “Oscars of management thinking.”

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    Oishii Farm Nabs Grand Prize at LAUNCH 2017

    May 4th, 2017

    oishii farm

    Left to right: Joanne Chen, BS EECS 05, a LAUNCH judge and partner at Foundational Capital; LAUNCH co-chair Sarah Yates, MBA 18; LAUNCH winners Hiroki Koga and Brendan Somerville, MBA 17; and LAUNCH co-chair Rob Moore, MBA 18.

    By Karen Sorensen

    After considering ideas ranging from garden-weeding robots to a new gene therapy for colon cancer, judges named Oishii Farm the winner at the Thursday finals of LAUNCH, UC Berkeley’s startup accelerator and competition.

    The team, led by Hiroki Koga, MBA 17, and Brendan Somerville, an MBA student at UCLA’s Anderson School of Management, pitched a vertical indoor organic gardening method now in use for strawberry production at a facility in in Japan. The startup was among 19 team that pitched judges before a crowd of more than 300 students, investors, and fellow entrepreneurs at Andersen Auditorium.

    Welcoming the students, Berkeley-Haas Dean Rich Lyons said that nothing satisfies him more than seeing students transform their attitudes about starting companies from “they do that” to “I do that.”

    A total of $45,000 in cash prizes, as well as a coveted spot in the Plug and Play Accelerator, were awarded to four different startups at the event, which was organized by Berkeley MBA students and sponsored by the Berkeley-Haas Entrepreneurship Program (BHEP). More than 10 of the teams included current or former Berkeley-Haas students.

    The evening featured talks by Christine Gulbranson, senior vice president for research innovation and entrepreneurship at the UC Office of the President, and Austin Walker, from the Forbes 30 under 30 list, whose Y Combinator-backed startup InnoVein was a LAUNCH winner last year.

    Gulbranson highlighted the new $22 million state-funded Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative that will expand entrepreneurial education, incubators, and accelerators at all 10 UC campuses.

    Rhonda Shrader, executive director of the Berkeley-Haas Entrepreneurship Program, said this year’s LAUNCH teams reflect the breadth and depth of talent and diversity in the UC system, with students and alums competing from UC Berkeley, UC Davis, UC Irvine, UCLA, UC San Diego, and UCSF.

    Started 19 years ago by Berkeley MBA students, LAUNCH evolved from a business plan competition to today’s startup accelerator model. More than 100 startups applied this year; 21 were selected to participate in the three-month-long accelerator, which pairs students with serial entrepreneur mentors and includes a curriculum taught by well-known Haas instructors. “LAUNCH has again attracted incredibly talented teams,” said LAUNCH student co-chair Sarah Yates, MBA 18. “While these teams come from diverse industries, ranging from education to healthcare to waste management, they share a fierce commitment to developing innovative, scalable businesses supported by Berkeley’s Lean Launchpad methodology.”

    The Winners

    Grand Prize ($25,000): Oishii Farm, which launched an indoor vertical farming technology that allows organic fruit to be sustainably produced anywhere in the world. The company said it has worked to solve problems with pollination and disease control that previously limited indoor vertical farming to leafy greens. Oishii is working to produce strawberries at commercial scale using 90 percent less land and 95 percent less water. The startup was a finalist in this year’s Global Social Venture Competition and is among the startups to receive $5,000 from the Dean’s Seed Fund.

    Runner Up ($15,000): Mekonos, which is developing a new approach to treating diseases using a silicon nano-robotic chip that delivers biomaterial or molecules into potentially millions of individual cells.  The team includes Anil Narasimha, BA 07 (molecular and cellular biology). Mekonos also took second place in the recent Bear Trap pitch competition sponsored by the Berkeley Entrepreneurs Association and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. They are currently participating in the National Science Foundation’s Innovation Corps’ Bay Area Node, which aims to commercialize university research and foster innovation. The node is run by Berkeley-Haas and the UC Berkeley College of Engineering.

    Audience Choice ($5,000): Pop Oats, which produces a crunchy snack made from the hulled kernels of oat grain. Pop oats, which are not cut, ground, or rolled, are high-fiber, protein rich, and GMO and gluten free. The team includes Marc Pfeiffer, BS 10, and Rodger Morris, BS 05.

    Plug and Play Award: (This team won placement in the three-month Plug and Play accelerator, with startup services valued at $150,000). Kokko Beauty built a mobile app that offers scientific color accuracy for makeup. The team includes CEO and Co-founder Nina Bhatti, BS 85, (EECS & mathematics) and Co-founder and Scott Trappe, MBA 96, vice president of technology.

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    How Sheryl Sandberg’s Sharing Manifesto Drives Facebook

    May 1st, 2017

    Sheryl Sandberg inspires both her fans and her employees to talk about sadness, even tragedy, at work. That can be healing—and highly profitable. “This younger generation really craves this authenticity, this vulnerability,” says Assoc. Adj. Prof. Kellie McElhaney.

    Source: 
    Bloomberg
    Source URL: 
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2017-04-27/how-sheryl-sandberg-s-sharing-manifesto-drives-facebook
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    MBA Student Looks to Next Quest: Easter Island by Wheelchair

    April 11th, 2017

    Alvaro Silberstein and his expedition teamPhoto credit: Pedro Paredes-Haz

    By Maya Mirsky

    Álvaro Silberstein, MBA 17, was on top of a mountain in Patagonia in his wheelchair last December, and the cameras were rolling.

    He was fulfilling his dream of making an arduous 50-kilometer trek through the landscape of granite towers and massive blue glaciers of the remote Torres del Paine National Park in his native Chile. Documentary filmmakers, part of his 12-member expedition, had captured dramatic footage along the way.

    Yet the achievement was just the beginning of a new chapter for Silberstein, who is using the trip’s success to fulfill an even greater goal: making more of the world’s most remote places accessible to adventurous tourists who happen to have disabilities.

    Through the Wheel the World nonprofit he formed with sponsor The North Face, Silberstein has now launched a crowdfunding campaign for a November trip to Easter Island. He aims to attract $20,000 to purchase two trekking wheelchairs and two hand bikes to leave behind for future visitors. 

    “Our main goal is not just me doing this adventure but making these adventures possible for more people,” he said.

    He’s already accomplished that in Patagonia. Silberstein raised $8,000 to buy a specialized trekking chair, which helped his team prevail through drenching rain to become the first to complete the tough “W” route at Torres del Paine in a wheelchair in six days. (Read more about the challenges they faced—and see full-sized photos—on UC Berkeley News.)

    “Álvaro is one of the strongest and optimistic people I have ever met,” said Matan Sela, MBA 17, a classmate who accompanied Silberstein to Patagonia. “In his mind, there is nothing he cannot accomplish, no matter how challenging it seems.”

    Alvaro's team pushes and pulls his chair along the narrow trailPhoto credit: Pedro Paredes-Haz

    The all-terrain chair they used has just one wheel for narrow trails and is meant to be both pulled and pushed with a harness and handles, making the trek a truly collaborative effort. It was that idea of collaboration that got Silberstein thinking that if he could figure out how to make the trip work for him, maybe he could help more than one person. 

    “We wanted all of that effort to be useful for other people too,” he said.

    He left the chair in Torres del Paine, along with a guide he and his team created for using it. Three people already have done so—including a 10-year-old boy. Another eight people have reserved it for next season.

    A spinal cord injury from a car accident when he was 18 left Silberstein with full paralysis from the chest down, and partial paralysis in his arms and hands. It changed his life, he said, but in many ways, it didn’t. Always a sports lover who enjoyed socializing and traveling, he still has the same goals and ambitions, from skiing in Tahoe to visiting national parks like Yosemite, where he was inspired by the easy access for disabled visitors.

    Alvaro Silberstein and his expedition team kayaking on a glacial lakePhoto credit: Pedro Paredes-Haz

    After he graduates in May, Silberstein will work on scaling Wheel the World to open more adventures to all people.

    The Patagonia trek has made Silberstein a bit of a folk hero in Chile, where 1,000 people turned out to see the premier of the documentary on his trip. The 15-minute film will be screened at Berkeley-Haas on Monday, April 17, in Andersen Auditorium.

    For some teaser footage, check out this short video on the trip by UC Berkeley Public Affairs (with footage from Wheel the World).

    Video of Trekking Patagonia in a wheelchair

     

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    Farming & Education Startups Rise to Top at Global Social Venture Competition

    April 11th, 2017

    By Krysten Crawford

    Sixteen teams of young entrepreneurs from around the world gathered at Berkeley-Haas Friday for the Global Social Venture Competition (GSVC)—launched by MBA students in 1999 and now one of the world’s leading contests for advances in social impact innovation.

    Nearly 600 entries from 64 countries had been whittled down to the 16 finalist teams who spent two days showcasing their ideas for changing the world. Haas student Hiroki Koga, MBA 17, and his startup, an indoor vertical farming operation called Oishii Farm, was one of six that made it to the final round Friday afternoon. Other top finalists hailed from Pakistan, Italy, France and elsewhere in the United States.

    The Kheyti teamPhoto by Bruce Cook

    In the end, Kheyti, a nonprofit that aims to lift rural farmers in India and beyond out of poverty via a low-cost “greenhouse-in-a-box” and related support services, took top honors. The team includes Kaushik K, an MBA student at Columbia Business School; Saumya, an MBA student at Kellogg School of Management; and Sathya Raghu V Mokkapati, Ayush Sharma, and Srikar Mokkapati, Sr., professionals based in Hyderabad, India.

    The first runner-up was MindRight, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that leverages text messages to help at-risk youth develop coping skills following a trauma. Third place went to Atlas, an Italian company that has developed a toxin-free biocide to combat the Zika virus and other mosquito-borne illnesses.

    1st Runners Up: MindRightPhoto by Bruce Cook

    This year’s competition awarded $80,000 in cash prizes. Most remarkable of all, says GSVC Program Director Jill Erbland, was the reaction from the judges—all social impact experts for at least a decade.

    “They felt that every one of the top finalist teams was very strong and had the capability to succeed as a viable company,” says Erbland, of the Center for Social Sector Leadership.

    Giving entrepreneurs a leg up

    The contest took place concurrently with the first annual Future of Social Ventures Conference, a one-day gathering whose featured speakers included Prof. Laura Tyson, director of the Berkeley-Haas Institute for Business & Social Impact, and His Excellency Amr Al Dabbagh, chairman and CEO of the Al-Dabbagh Group and founding chairman of the Stars Foundation and Philanthropy University.

    Laura Tyson and His Excellency Amr Al DabbaghLaura Tyson interviews His Excellency Amr Al Dabbagh. Photo by Bruce Cook

    The event also included a design workshop with Alisa Ahmadian and Elana Gurney of OpenIDEO, as well as a lunchtime talk by Kim Wright-Volich, managing partner at impact investing consulting firm Tideline.

    “The prize money is great, but ultimately the GSVC is an opportunity for social impact entrepreneurs to hone their pitches and network with potential investors and advisers,” says Erbland, who adds that past teams have secured funding from investors who attended the competition.

    Entry rules require that at least one member of each team be a student or recent graduate of either an undergraduate or graduate academic program.

    Adding new meaning to farm-to-table

    Hiroko KogaAmong the many discoveries Koga made after moving across the Pacific: fruits and vegetables in the U.S. are tasteless compared to those in Japan. “There’s just no comparison,” says Koga (right), who described the core problem as one of distribution. Most fruit and vegetables can’t get from farms to grocery stores when they are at their peak freshness—many crops are designed specifically to be transported long distances, and this has a negative impact on taste. “The global food supply chain is a mess,” says Koga.

    Indoor vertical farming solves the distribution problem by using technology to grow food year-round in stacked layers located in urban warehouses or city highrises, providing consumers with access to high quality, locally grown fresh produce. The social impact component: vertical farming uses significantly less land and water than traditional agriculture, eliminates food waste, and promises safer working conditions for laborers.

    Oishii Farm is unique among indoor vertical farming operations, Koga and his co-founders told a panel of six judges during their final ten-minute pitch. Other vertical farming companies, they said, grow only leafy greens because the high risk of disease and the challenges of pollination in enclosed spaces have so far ruled out fruit crops.

    The company has found a solution to the fruit cultivation problem, which requires more complex processes and technologies than leafy greens. “We are the first company to overcome the technological barriers to growing fruit at commercial scale using vertical indoor techniques,” said Koga in an interview before the GSVC’s final round. (He declined to elaborate on the company’s proprietary technology.)

    Earlier this year, Oishii Farm was one of 11 Haas startups to receive $5,000 each from the Dean’s Seed Fund.

    Reaching the GSVC finals, says Koga, gave Oishii Farm instant credibility. “Receiving tremendously positive feedback from judges and social entrepreneurs validated our social mission and long-term vision to revolutionize agriculture,” says Koga, who will continue to build the for-profit company after graduation.

    Koga was also impressed with his competitors’ commitment to social causes. “The people I met aren’t looking to create the next unicorn and become billionaires,” he says. “They are all so passionate about solving a social issue and changing the world in some way regardless of the impact they ultimately have. I really respect that.”

    GSVC organizersCompetition organizers celebrate after the final round. Photo by Bruce Cook

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    Prof. Ulrike Malmendier Awarded Guggenheim Fellowship

    April 8th, 2017

    Ulrike MalmendierBerkeley-Haas Finance Prof. Ulrike Malmendier, a pioneer in the field of behavioral economics, has been named a 2017 Guggenheim Fellow for her research on financial behavior.

    Malmendier, was among 173 scholars, artists, and scientists chosen from nearly 3,000 applicants for the award, which is given annually by the John Simon Memorial Guggenheim Foundation. The recipients include seven UC Berkeley faculty—more than any other university.

    The fellowships are granted on the basis of prior achievement and exceptional promise.

    The award money—about $5,000—is tied to a specific project. Malmendier will use the grant to continue her research on the Experience Effect, her theory that financial behavior is influenced by the economic conditions that a person has lived through.

    This year’s other fellows from UC Berkeley are: Wendy Brown (Political Science); Cindy Cox (Music Composition); Tom Griffiths (Psychology); Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann (European & Latin American History); Samuel Otter (American Literature); and Richmond Sarpong (Chemistry).

    Malmendier, who has taught finance at Haas since 2010, is the Edward J. and Mollie Arnold Professor of Finance at Haas and a professor of economics at UC Berkeley, where she is the founding co-chair of the Initiative in Behavioral Finance and Economics.

    She won the prestigious Fischer Black Prize from the American Finance Association in 2013, for the originality and creativity of her research. She was inducted to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2016. 

    Malmendier focuses on the intersection of economics and finance, and why and how individuals make decisions. Some of her work includes research on CEO overconfidence, the long-term frugality of “Depression babies,” and the decision-making behind gym membership. Recently, she’s researched the impact of economic shocks, such as high inflation or unemployment, on later economic behavior.

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    Bridge 2017 Berkeley Asia Business Conference

    March 22nd, 2017

    “Unlocking Value and Impact
    Friday, April 14
    1pm to 7pm
    Berkeley-Haas campus

    Buy tickets

     

    Wednesday, March 22, 2017 – 12:29

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    Africa Business Forum 2017

    March 22nd, 2017

    Saturday, April 29
    Sutardja Dai Hall, UC Berkeley Campus

    Register

    Wednesday, March 22, 2017 – 12:37

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    40 Under 40: Panos Patatoukas: UC Berkeley, Haas School of Business

    March 22nd, 2017

    Patatoukas, who is 35, says he wants to make financial information analysis accessible to all by age 40.

    Source: 
    San Francisco Business Times
    Source URL: 
    http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/news/2017/03/17/young-leaders-40-under-panos-patatoukas-ucb-haas.html
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